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President Ernest Koroma launches Agenda For Prosperity with challenge to all Sierra Leoneans to go for it to make it successful

Friday, July 12th, 2013

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY  PRESIDENT DR ERNEST BAI KOROMA AT THE LAUNCHING OF THE AGENDA FOR PROSPERITY IN FREETOWN

 

It is with great expectations that I today launch our Agenda for Prosperity. For the next five years, this Agenda will be our road map towards meeting our goal of becoming a middle income country and donor nation within the next 25 to 50 years. This Agenda is the firming up of the aspirations of our people. We made tremendous progress during our implementation of the Agenda for Change. We built roads everywhere, attracted billions of dollars of investment in agriculture, mining and other sectors and ensured one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

We commenced the creation of a favourable environment for the private sector to thrive, established a free healthcare program for pregnant women, mothers and children under five, and more than doubled resources allocated to education. We improved electricity supply, provided funds for local government more than any other government before, ensured the reduction of poverty, and continued the consolidation of our democracy through greater respect for human rights, gender equity, and a freer press.

LAUNCH OF AGENDA FOR PROSPERITY (600 x 448)

 

 

AGENDAFORCHANGELAUNCHING (600 x 450)

PHOTO CREDIT : FODAY MANSARAY OF COCORIOKO

We still face challenges, but we are a government dedicated to doing more to sustain the transformation of our country. That was why when Sierra Leone turned 50 in 2011, I constituted a Committee on Development and Transformation, charged with the responsibility to take stock of the progress we have made as an independent nation over the last 50 years and to chart the way forward for the next 50 years. The Committee organised the Sierra Leone Conference on Development and Transformation, which came up with a number of outcomes.

I took these recommendations on board when I asked for re-election; my party, the All Peoples Congress endorsed these aspirations when we asked for the peoples mandate for the next five years. This Agenda for Prosperity is therefore the outcome of the pact between the people of this country, my party, my government and myself to do more. We will do more to complete residual projects in the Agenda for Change and to address recurring and emerging challenges. We will do more to address unemployment, particularly among the youth. We all need to do more to better manage our natural resources for the good of all Sierra Leoneans, we need to do more to add value to our primary products, and we need to extend, expand and sustain the Free Health Care and Scaling-Up Nutrition initiatives. We will reform the education system to meet the emerging needs in the job market, we will finish on-going projects in roads, energy and water supply, and we will build much needed infrastructure, including the new mainland airport, railway, roads and ICT capabilities; provide a social safety net for the vulnerable population; promote good governance; ensure that the public sector is capacitated to deliver; empower our women and ensure equal opportunities for both men and women; and above all, we will sustain our fight against corruption, and provide the enabling environment for the private sector to thrive. We prepared this Agenda for Prosperity to guide our collective aspirations to doing more to sustain the transformation of our country. We hope to draw on lessons learnt and to merge innovations with the strong economic growth we have recorded in the last five years.

This new imperative calls for smart work, resilience, and discipline. It calls for the assertion of our best in our relations with each other, with work, with government resources and with our collective inheritance. We are the best nation in religious tolerance, and the friendliness of our people to strangers is second to none in the world. We must carry these attributes of being best to the productive sectors of agriculture, mining, tourism, business partnerships, financial services, education, and healthcare. We must ensure that our economy is diversified to promote inclusive and sustainable growth. We must anchor our Agenda on efforts at being globally credible and internationally competitive. This may require partnerships with internationals in building up capacities in our judiciary, our foreign ministry and other key state institutions. To be successful in the global environment we need to draw upon the best and committed within the country, the best and committed within the Diaspora and the best and committed at the global level. Implementing the Agenda for Prosperity will require concerted efforts, collaboration and coordination among Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs). Emphasis will be placed on monitoring of projects to ensure that results are achieved on timely manner. We will continue to attract foreign direct investment by forging strong partnerships with the private sector, especially on large-scale projects. The Agenda for Prosperity is the country’s one vision and one plan. Its implementation will be guided by strong commitments by Development Partners as well as the Government.

In this regard, Government is developing a mutual accountability framework that will be jointly monitored and reported on. Our goal is to strengthen the partnership between Government and Development Partners as well as ensuring that the voice and opinion of each and every Sierra Leonean is heard in the implementation as was done through wider consultation in developing this national plan.

As we embark on this epic journey to become a middle income country, let me remind fellow Sierra Leoneans that we are today re-committing ourselves to asserting our best. Prosperity is not a gift on a silver platter. Abundance of natural resources is only half the story; the reality of prosperity only comes to a people that go for it. We must go for it with determination. We must sweat it out with our hands, with our brains and with our minds. We must set out to embrace the values of innovation, of cultural renewal in the workplace and respect for public goods. Most importantly, all Sierra Leoneans, at home and in the Diaspora, must realise that success primarily depends on what we as a people do for ourselves and not on what others do for us. Ask not what others have done for you, but what you have done for yourself, your community and your nation. The possibilities of growth, renewal and transformation reside in every Sierra Leonean. We must assert these possibilities to seize the destiny of prosperity. I am very optimistic that we will be successful; I believe that we will all do more; and that together we will achieve the goals that we have set out for ourselves in our Agenda for Prosperity.

President Ernest Koroma launches Agenda For Prosperity with challenge to all Sierra Leoneans to go for it to make it successful

Friday, July 12th, 2013
 KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY  PRESIDENT DR ERNEST BAI KOROMA AT THE LAUNCHING OF THE AGENDA FOR PROSPERITY IN FREETOWN

 

It is with great expectations that I today launch our Agenda for Prosperity. For the next five years, this Agenda will be our road map towards meeting our goal of becoming a middle income country and donor nation within the next 25 to 50 years. This Agenda is the firming up of the aspirations of our people. We made tremendous progress during our implementation of the Agenda for Change. We built roads everywhere, attracted billions of dollars of investment in agriculture, mining and other sectors and ensured one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

We commenced the creation of a favourable environment for the private sector to thrive, established a free healthcare program for pregnant women, mothers and children under five, and more than doubled resources allocated to education. We improved electricity supply, provided funds for local government more than any other government before, ensured the reduction of poverty, and continued the consolidation of our democracy through greater respect for human rights, gender equity, and a freer press.

LAUNCH OF AGENDA FOR PROSPERITY (600 x 448)

 

 

AGENDAFORCHANGELAUNCHING (600 x 450)

 

We still face challenges, but we are a government dedicated to doing more to sustain the transformation of our country. That was why when Sierra Leone turned 50 in 2011, I constituted a Committee on Development and Transformation, charged with the responsibility to take stock of the progress we have made as an independent nation over the last 50 years and to chart the way forward for the next 50 years.

The Committee organised the Sierra Leone Conference on Development and Transformation, which came up with a number of outcomes. I took these recommendations on board when I asked for re-election; my party, the All Peoples Congress endorsed these aspirations when we asked for the peoples mandate for the next five years. This Agenda for Prosperity is therefore the outcome of the pact between the people of this country, my party, my government and myself to do more. We will do more to complete residual projects in the Agenda for Change and to address recurring and emerging challenges. We will do more to address unemployment, particularly among the youth. We all need to do more to better manage our natural resources for the good of all Sierra Leoneans, we need to do more to add value to our primary products, and we need to extend, expand and sustain the Free Health Care and Scaling-Up Nutrition initiatives. We will reform the education system to meet the emerging needs in the job market, we will finish on-going projects in roads, energy and water supply, and we will build much needed infrastructure, including the new mainland airport, railway, roads and ICT capabilities; provide a social safety net for the vulnerable population; promote good governance; ensure that the public sector is capacitated to deliver; empower our women and ensure equal opportunities for both men and women; and above all, we will sustain our fight against corruption, and provide the enabling environment for the private sector to thrive. We prepared this Agenda for Prosperity to guide our collective aspirations to doing more to sustain the transformation of our country. We hope to draw on lessons learnt and to merge innovations with the strong economic growth we have recorded in the last five years.

 

This new imperative calls for smart work, resilience, and discipline. It calls for the assertion of our best in our relations with each other, with work, with government resources and with our collective inheritance. We are the best nation in religious tolerance, and the friendliness of our people to strangers is second to none in the world. We must carry these attributes of being best to the productive sectors of agriculture, mining, tourism, business partnerships, financial services, education, and healthcare. We must ensure that our economy is diversified to promote inclusive and sustainable growth. We must anchor our Agenda on efforts at being globally credible and internationally competitive. This may require partnerships with internationals in building up capacities in our judiciary, our foreign ministry and other key state institutions. To be successful in the global environment we need to draw upon the best and committed within the country, the best and committed within the Diaspora and the best and committed at the global level. Implementing the Agenda for Prosperity will require concerted efforts, collaboration and coordination among Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs). Emphasis will be placed on monitoring of projects to ensure that results are achieved on timely manner. We will continue to attract foreign direct investment by forging strong partnerships with the private sector, especially on large-scale projects.

 

The Agenda for Prosperity is the country’s one vision and one plan. Its implementation will be guided by strong commitments by Development Partners as well as the Government. In this regard, Government is developing a mutual accountability framework that will be jointly monitored and reported on. Our goal is to strengthen the partnership between Government and Development Partners as well as ensuring that the voice and opinion of each and every Sierra Leonean is heard in the implementation as was done through wider consultation in developing this national plan. As we embark on this epic journey to become a middle income country, let me remind fellow Sierra Leoneans that we are today re-committing ourselves to asserting our best.

Prosperity is not a gift on a silver platter. Abundance of natural resources is only half the story; the reality of prosperity only comes to a people that go for it. We must go for it with determination. We must sweat it out with our hands, with our brains and with our minds. We must set out to embrace the values of innovation, of cultural renewal in the workplace and respect for public goods. Most importantly, all Sierra Leoneans, at home and in the Diaspora, must realise that success primarily depends on what we as a people do for ourselves and not on what others do for us. Ask not what others have done for you, but what you have done for yourself, your community and your nation. The possibilities of growth, renewal and transformation reside in every Sierra Leonean. We must assert these possibilities to seize the destiny of prosperity. I am very optimistic that we will be successful; I believe that we will all do more; and that together we will achieve the goals that we have set out for ourselves in our Agenda for Prosperity.

PROSPERITY IN OUR TIME

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

By Titus Boye-Thompson :

For those who have had the privilege of interacting with him, President Ernest Bai Koroma exudes a most magnificent persona. He is a good listener. So good that sometimes you would be pardoned for thinking that he has ignored every word you have said. In truth, it is just his nature to listen and take note of whatever you say. He has, in the recent time, taken an extra step to be attentive. He now takes down jottings as you speak to him. He does this because, conscientious as he is, he wants to ensure that he keeps the salient points of your conversation on record, and to note any action points that you would require of him. This is very good management practice. As an aspect of time management, it is commendable that such a practice has now spread to his close aides.
Titus-Boye-Thompson

Having regard to his keen sense of purpose, it was uncompromising when President Koroma first mooted prosperity as an objective goal, for it was greeted with derision at some quarters. However, his commitment to the concept thus far can only but change the minds and positions of skeptics. To understand the scope and context of prosperity that President Koroma envisages for Sierra Leone is to be apprised of a man with a vigor that inspires dedication and commitment to duty. He makes the opportunity to serve as real as NATCO biscuit. You can hold it in your hands and crack it, the only thing is that you cannot tell where it will break up. This brings to mind the football allegory to politics. It is a validation of his astute understanding and delicate handling of politically sensitive issues that President Koroma has for all intents and purposes earned the allusion as a World’s best at what he does. In the event, if prosperity is a goal, no one can be as guaranteed to score than President Ernest Bai Koroma. It is therefore necessary to understand the measure of his vision by an in-depth assessment of his persona and thus grasp an understanding of why this man can so self assuredly promise prosperity to Sierra Leoneans

President Koroma inherited a failed PRSP strategy paper, rejected by the UN in 2006. When the APC Party came into power in 2007, the new Government was obligated to review the PRSP 2 that had been rejected by the United Nations as substandard and inadequate to the needs of Sierra Leone or in fact below the threshold for what could easily be addressed as tangible proposals for addressing poverty in post conflict Sierra Leone. At the instance of being swept to power, President Koroma had already proffered to the people for Sierra Leone, the APC Manifesto with which he won their mandate. Astute as he is, President Koroma directed that the review of PRSP 2 take into cognizance the APC Manifesto which indeed had been endorsed by the people of Sierra Leone through the ballot box. In the event, no other PRSP, the World over can be attested to have had such veracity of acceptance by the people whose life it claimed to affect or indeed enjoy that level of legitimacy. So it was that the APC Manifesto which was aptly called the Agenda for Change was reviewed alongside the PRSP 2 on its second submission and thereby ascribed as the “Agenda for Change – Sierra Leone’s poverty reduction strategy paper 2.” Consequently, the acceptance in its entirety of the second submission of Sierra Leone’s PRSP 2 was an indictment of the previous SLPP Government and by extension, a validation of the APC Manifesto as a well thought out document that outlined key goals for Sierra Leone to tackle poverty and achieve self sustaining growth.

The speed with which President Ernest Bai Koroma moved to secure his vision under the Agenda for Change can only attest to his drive and commitment to make a difference in the lives of every Sierra Leonean. The improvement in energy generation and domestic electricity, the improvements in the rule of law and the institutions that underpin our democracy, the new roads constructed all over the country, improvements in education and health – specifically with the introduction of the free healthcare for pregnant women and lactating mothers all attest to a man who is dedicated to keeping his word. He has on many occasions demonstrated that he does not lie, so when he says that if elected, he will do more for Sierra Leone, he must be trusted to be telling the truth.

The launch of the Agenda for Prosperity on Friday 12th July 2013 is a manifestation of a President keeping to his word. He made an open declaration to commit to doing more than what he achieved under the Agenda for Change. This promise of prosperity is enshrined in the country’s poverty reduction strategy paper 3, a commitment to the world via the UN system of organizations that Sierra Leone is ready to tackle its obligations under international commitments to work towards reducing poverty as the central plank of its economic development aspirations.

The Agenda for Prosperity is a thorough commitment which, for the first time, and in many cases Sierra Leone is the first country to mainstream gender issues as key constraints to economic growth and through practical interventions addressing inequality, argues for parity between men and women, boys and girls. The President’s vision to expand the boundaries of opportunity to young people is also a central aspect of this aspiration and in the Agenda for Prosperity, the gauntlet has been laid down for young people to take control of their destinies, assume positions of authority and excel in skills and technologies that will make this country a great nation.

The launch of the Agenda for prosperity is an open invitation for progress. It asks of every Sierra Leonean to do something positive towards making this nation a progressive one. No one could ask for more. President Ernest Bai Koroma has done his own part to ensure that he makes good on his promise. As he has delivered on his words, let us all now move towards that prosperity he has promised us and in the process enjoy this great Nation, this land that we love, our Sierra Leone.

Posted by  on July 11, 20130 Comment

By Titus Boye-Thompson :

For those who have had the privilege of interacting with him, President Ernest Bai Koroma exudes a most magnificent persona. He is a good listener. So good that sometimes you would be pardoned for thinking that he has ignored every word you have said. In truth, it is just his nature to listen and take note of whatever you say. He has, in the recent time, taken an extra step to be attentive. He now takes down jottings as you speak to him. He does this because, conscientious as he is, he wants to ensure that he keeps the salient points of your conversation on record, and to note any action points that you would require of him. This is very good management practice. As an aspect of time management, it is commendable that such a practice has now spread to his close aides.
Titus-Boye-Thompson

Having regard to his keen sense of purpose, it was uncompromising when President Koroma first mooted prosperity as an objective goal, for it was greeted with derision at some quarters. However, his commitment to the concept thus far can only but change the minds and positions of skeptics. To understand the scope and context of prosperity that President Koroma envisages for Sierra Leone is to be apprised of a man with a vigor that inspires dedication and commitment to duty. He makes the opportunity to serve as real as NATCO biscuit. You can hold it in your hands and crack it, the only thing is that you cannot tell where it will break up. This brings to mind the football allegory to politics. It is a validation of his astute understanding and delicate handling of politically sensitive issues that President Koroma has for all intents and purposes earned the allusion as a World’s best at what he does. In the event, if prosperity is a goal, no one can be as guaranteed to score than President Ernest Bai Koroma. It is therefore necessary to understand the measure of his vision by an in-depth assessment of his persona and thus grasp an understanding of why this man can so self assuredly promise prosperity to Sierra Leoneans

President Koroma inherited a failed PRSP strategy paper, rejected by the UN in 2006. When the APC Party came into power in 2007, the new Government was obligated to review the PRSP 2 that had been rejected by the United Nations as substandard and inadequate to the needs of Sierra Leone or in fact below the threshold for what could easily be addressed as tangible proposals for addressing poverty in post conflict Sierra Leone. At the instance of being swept to power, President Koroma had already proffered to the people for Sierra Leone, the APC Manifesto with which he won their mandate. Astute as he is, President Koroma directed that the review of PRSP 2 take into cognizance the APC Manifesto which indeed had been endorsed by the people of Sierra Leone through the ballot box. In the event, no other PRSP, the World over can be attested to have had such veracity of acceptance by the people whose life it claimed to affect or indeed enjoy that level of legitimacy. So it was that the APC Manifesto which was aptly called the Agenda for Change was reviewed alongside the PRSP 2 on its second submission and thereby ascribed as the “Agenda for Change – Sierra Leone’s poverty reduction strategy paper 2.” Consequently, the acceptance in its entirety of the second submission of Sierra Leone’s PRSP 2 was an indictment of the previous SLPP Government and by extension, a validation of the APC Manifesto as a well thought out document that outlined key goals for Sierra Leone to tackle poverty and achieve self sustaining growth.

The speed with which President Ernest Bai Koroma moved to secure his vision under the Agenda for Change can only attest to his drive and commitment to make a difference in the lives of every Sierra Leonean. The improvement in energy generation and domestic electricity, the improvements in the rule of law and the institutions that underpin our democracy, the new roads constructed all over the country, improvements in education and health – specifically with the introduction of the free healthcare for pregnant women and lactating mothers all attest to a man who is dedicated to keeping his word. He has on many occasions demonstrated that he does not lie, so when he says that if elected, he will do more for Sierra Leone, he must be trusted to be telling the truth.

The launch of the Agenda for Prosperity on Friday 12th July 2013 is a manifestation of a President keeping to his word. He made an open declaration to commit to doing more than what he achieved under the Agenda for Change. This promise of prosperity is enshrined in the country’s poverty reduction strategy paper 3, a commitment to the world via the UN system of organizations that Sierra Leone is ready to tackle its obligations under international commitments to work towards reducing poverty as the central plank of its economic development aspirations.

The Agenda for Prosperity is a thorough commitment which, for the first time, and in many cases Sierra Leone is the first country to mainstream gender issues as key constraints to economic growth and through practical interventions addressing inequality, argues for parity between men and women, boys and girls. The President’s vision to expand the boundaries of opportunity to young people is also a central aspect of this aspiration and in the Agenda for Prosperity, the gauntlet has been laid down for young people to take control of their destinies, assume positions of authority and excel in skills and technologies that will make this country a great nation.

The launch of the Agenda for prosperity is an open invitation for progress. It asks of every Sierra Leonean to do something positive towards making this nation a progressive one. No one could ask for more. President Ernest Bai Koroma has done his own part to ensure that he makes good on his promise. As he has delivered on his words, let us all now move towards that prosperity he has promised us and in the process enjoy this great Nation, this land that we love, our Sierra Leone.

President Ernest Koroma to launch Agenda For Prosperity in Sierra Leone on Friday

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

By State House :

The Government of Sierra Leone under the astute and transformative leadership of President Dr Ernest Bai Koroma (GCRSL) will officially launch the Agenda for Prosperity on Friday morning at the Miatta Conference Centre, Youyi Building, Brookfields, Freetown.

Sierra Leone’s Vision for 2013 to 2035 is to become a middle-income country. It would be an inclusive, green country, with 80% of the population above the poverty line. It would have gender equality, a well-educated, healthy population, good governance and rule of law, well-developed infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, with private-sector, export-led growth generating wide employment opportunities; there would be good environmental protection, and responsible natural resource exploitation.

PRESIDENTAGENDAFORPROSPERITY-600-x-3992

 

After generally satisfactory experience with the Agenda for Change (AfC), 2008-2012, Sierra Leone is now embarking on the Agenda for Prosperity (AfP), for social and economic development for 2013-2018. Rapid expected growth in minerals production and export, together with the potential for petroleum exploitation, should provide resources to help transform the country and make the AfP feasible. Problems in implementing AfC have been carefully assessed, and measures developed to avoid them in the AfP.

President Koroma is expected to talk on a number of issues bordering on the continued development and transformation of the country during and after his term of office. He will commit himself to accelerating the eradication of hunger and malnutrition, with a strengthened focus on women and children from conception to two years of age, to prevent the irreversible effects of stunting. The president will talk on the establishment of a multi-sectorial nutrition coordination secretariat to address these issues.

The Chief Executive is also expected to address the issue of youth unemployment, better management of our natural resources for the good of all citizens of Sierra Leone, and also expand and sustain the Free Health Care and Scaling-Up Nutrition initiatives, reform the educational system to make our graduates more competitive in the job market, as well as concluding all ongoing road, energy and water supply projects all across the country.

The Transparency International nonsense about Sierra Leone : When will these organizations leave us alone with their flawed polls and For-Profit lies ?

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

By KABS KANU :

Just when you want to think that Transparency International should be taken seriously after previous flawed studies and polls , then this . How can a whole organization that wants to be looked  at as credible base their conclusions on the number of people who said they paid a bribe to a public body in the last year  ?  How many times must it be drummed home to these organizations that in these guided polls, people often lie, exaggerate or even deliberately misinform , depending on their state of mind at the time ?

While it is an undeniable fact that there is corruption in Sierra Leone, like other countries, the method of arriving at their conclusion that corruption is more prevalent in Sierra Leone than other countries is questionable , given the method used. The method of research or polling determines the validity of the conclusions. It has been found out that most people polled in such studies answer to please or satisfy the preconceived notions of the pollster.

sierraleonemap

 

Of course , as seen in the social media, online forums and online newspapers, many Sierra Leoneans want to tarnish the image of their country for purely partisan reasons. How neutral were the people polled by Transparency International ?  How wide was the field of respondents ?  Did the poll involve Sierra Leoneans from all walks of life ? If the field of respondents involve only a small sample and they do not represent the entire country, how can Transparency International build such far-reaching conclusions on the polls ?  This had always been the problem with such polls and that is why they are unreliable and inaccurate.

The problems with opinion polls have been dealt with by reputable organizations. In a study of opinion polls by History. org , it was discovered that they do not produce an accurate reflection of the situation they want to portray.  The organization states :  ”So the first requirement of a trustworthy poll is the selection of an accurate sample or miniature of the population.” We do not think that this was done by Transparency International. The organization also posits : “The size of the sample used in opinion polling naturally affects the accuracy of the results.” How can you talk to a few people who may not even be telling you the truth and then conclude from their responses that a country is the most corrupt . One would have thought that an important organization like Transparency International would have depended more on field studies.

Organizations like Transparency International are not only doing a great disservice to their own credibility ; they are hurting the interests of hardworking and striving countries like Sierra Leone. Just when Sierra Leone has forged very important and valuable socio-economic and political as well as diplomatic partnerships with credible partners-in-progress, donor agencies and goodwill nations, then comes this very flawed and unfair polls that has the capacity to change the good perceptions we have toiled blood, sweat and tears to carve out over the past years  about our country .

Since President Ernest Bai Koroma came to power in Sierra Leone , this country has waged an undaunted and determined battle against corruption. The President ensured that he gave more teeth and sweeping powers to the Anti-Corruption Commission ( ACC) and not only that there have been more prosecution of corrupt elements than ever in the history of the nation. The reason that it seems like there is prevalent corruption in Sierra Leone is that the government of President Ernest Bai Koroma has created greater awareness of the evil and more people are being prosecuted now than ever , unlike the past when everything was buried under an avalanche of official secrecy and cover-ups and the media were so kept in the dark that there was little outcry as we have today. Organizations like Transparency International should be professional and credible enough to recognize the efforts being made by President Koroma and Government to nip corruption in the bud.

It would be very optimistic to expect Transparency International to follow such a course because they are nothing but a For-Profit organization that has to reinforce the preconceived notions of theor principals.

WE WILL DISCUSS THAT IN PART 2 TOMORROW

 

 

 

 

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